Menu
When returning forms via email to the School Office please use forms@abc.aquilatrust.co.uk. For all other enquiries, please continue to email office@abc.aquilatrust.co.uk. Why not visit our Facebook Page! https://www.facebook.com/ArchbishopCourtenay

Archbishop Courtenay Primary School

Home Page

Archbishop Courtenay Primary School

Home Page

Long-term Plans and Progression

The geography projects are well sequenced to provide a coherent subject scheme that develops children’s geographical knowledge, skills and subject disciplines.

Geographical locations are not specified in the national curriculum, so they have been chosen to provide a broad and diverse understanding of the world.

Where there are opportunities for making meaningful connections with other projects, geography projects are sequenced accordingly. For example, children revisit the geography of settlements in the history project School Days after studying types of settlements in the geography project Bright Lights, Big City.

All geography projects are taught in the autumn and spring terms, with opportunities for us to revisit less secure concepts in the summer term.

 

EYFS

In EYFS, children are taught the foundations of geography through carefully selected and sequences projects. They learn maps are pictures or drawings of an area of land or sea and  make and use simple maps in their play to represent places and journeys, real and imagined. Pupils are introduced to positional language to describe where things are in relation to one another and give directions through prepositions: in, on, next to, behind, in front of, in between, above, below and underneath. They learn that globes and maps can show us the location of different places around the world and are taught to identify the United Kingdom on a world map or globe. Pupils discuss different places around the world, including oceans and seas and describe how the weather, plants and animals of one place is different to another using simple geographical terms. They learn places can have different climates, weather, food, religions, culture, wildlife, transport and amenities and describe how two places are the same or different using simple picture maps, photographs, data and other geographical resources. Through discussion and description of places that are important to them, they understand how a place can be important because of its location, use buildings or landscape. They learn how the local environment has changed over time using photographs and first-hand experiences and how key features of the local environment are shown on maps and in photographs. Photographs and maps are also used to identify and describe human and physical features of the children’s locality. Geography Fieldwork the children undertake includes going on walks and visits to collect information about the environment, through  photographs, drawings and simple picture maps pupils make, and collection of  simple data during the activities. Pupils learn about typical weather patterns for each of the four seasons in the United Kingdom and record observations about the way the local environment changes throughout each of these. They learn to understand how all types of weather can affect the environment and how humans make use of these. For example, on sunny days, people might go to the park or the coastline.

 

Key Stage 1

In Key Stage 1, each autumn term begins with essential skills and knowledge projects (Our Wonderful World in Year 1 and Let’s Explore the World in Year 2). Teaching these projects in Years 1 and 2 enables children to be introduced to, or revisit, critical geographical concepts, aspects, skills and knowledge. These projects prepare children for the study of more thematic geography projects in the following term. In the spring term of Year 1, children study the project Bright Lights, Big City. This project introduces children to the geography of urban environments and the physical and human features of the United Kingdom. In contrast, in the spring term of Year 2, children carry out a detailed study of coastal geography in the project Coastline. This project introduces children to the geography of coastal environments and provides children with the opportunity for in-depth coastal fieldwork.

 

Lower Key Stage 2

In Lower Key Stage 2, children begin with essential skills and knowledge projects (One Planet, Our World in Year 3 and Interconnected World in Year 4). Teaching these projects in Years 3 and 4 enables children to further develop their skills, knowledge and understanding of key geographical aspects and concepts and prepares them to study more thematic geography projects in the following term. In the spring term of Year 3, children study the project Rocks, Relics and Rumbles, which explores physical features and geographical phenomena, including earthquakes and volcanoes. In contrast, in the spring term of Year 4, children carry out a detailed study of the physical features of mountains and rivers, which includes opportunities for in-depth fieldwork.

 

Upper Key Stage 2

In Upper Key Stage 2, children again begin with essential skills and knowledge projects (Investigating Our World in Year 5 and Our Changing World in Year 6). Teaching these projects in Years 5 and 6 enables children to develop their skills, knowledge and understanding of key geographical aspects and concepts and prepares them to study more thematic geography projects in the following term. In the spring term of Year 5, children study the seasonal project Sow, Grow and Farm, which explores farming, agriculture and rural land use. In the spring term of Year 6, children study the polar regions in the project Frozen Kingdoms. The project includes an in-depth analysis of the characteristics of these regions, including environmental issues. Throughout the geography scheme, there is complete coverage of all national curriculum programmes of study.

 

Top